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All reviews and site design © by Thomas M. Wagner. SF Reviews.net logo by Charles Hurst. Wink the Astrokitty drawn by Matt Olson. All rights reserved. Book cover artwork is copyrighted by its respective artist and/or publisher.




Welcome to SF REVIEWS.NET, where discriminating readers of SF and fantasy will find in-depth reviews of hundreds of books both new and old. Thanks for visiting and I hope you find the site a helpful resource for years to come! Set a bookmark or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Thomas M. Wagner
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SFF180 — SFReviews.net New YouTube Series

I am proud to announce the launch of SFF180, the companion YouTube channel of SFReviews.net. Please go and subscribe!
All new-release titles I review will now recieve both text and video reviews. Over the next few weeks I will be refreshing the old site here, adding the text reviews of the new books I've begun to cover on SFF180 and bringing everything current. It will be a great pleasure reviewing for you all once again, and I'm looking forward to it.
—Thomas M. Wagner, February 11, 2014

MAILBAG MONDAY: Showcasing all new review copies received for each week.


TOTAL BOOKS REVIEWED: 702
LATEST ADDITIONS RSS feed button

NEW 2014 LISTINGS

  • New The Martian / Andy Weir (added 3/17/14)
    A freak accident leaves a lone astronaut stranded on Mars in this suspenseful and meticulously researched hard SF debut in which not a single note rings untrue.
  • A Darkling Sea / James L. Cambias Three stars (added 2/20/14)
    On an icy oceanic moon where human scientists are studying an intelligent aquatic civilization, a tragic mistake causes tensions to escalate between the humans and the alien Sholen, whose laws against noninterference are very strict. Could even war be in the offing? Confident old-school hard SF with expected first-novel hiccups.

EARLIER 2013 LISTINGS

  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane / Neil Gaiman (added 4/28/13)
    Another eerie piece of bedtime baroque by perennial fan-favorite Gaiman, in which a man recalls his childhood experiences with a curious family of women protecting their little corner of the world from invasive evil forces. Gaiman has a history of prioritizing style over substance, but here he's found the right narrative for his haunting, poetic visions.
  • The Goliath Stone / Larry Niven & Matthew Joseph Harrington (added 4/28/13)
    Feeble, forgettable hard SF throwaway about nanotech that becomes its own autonomous civilization after being shot into space to deal with an encroaching asteroid. Potentially interesting variation on the first-contact premise is undone by dreadful (and way too pleased with itself) storytelling that is utterly bereft of suspense or excitement.
  • And Blue Skies from Pain / Stina Leicht (added 4/15/13)
    Two-time Campbell nominee Leicht's sequel to her acclaimed debut Of Blood and Honey is written to the same high standards of excellence, but it's even more grim, violent and brutal. Its relentlessly bleak tone almost overwhelms the narrative, and even admirers of the previous book may find this one off-putting.

This site is dedicated to the memory of Johnny M. Lee, who passed away tragically in 1991. Johnny was something of a mentor figure to me when I got into SF fandom as a teenager in the 80's, and he is still missed.

"In the arts, the critic is the only independent source of information. The rest is advertising." —Pauline Kael
"If you are in difficulties with a book, try the element of surprise: attack it at an hour when it isn't expecting it."
—H.G. Wells